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A self-taught scientist, Michael Faraday (1791-1867) excelled in chemistry and physics to become one of the most influential thinkers in history. He’s been called the “father of electricity,” (Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison also wear that crown) and his appetite for experimenting knew no bounds. “Nothing is too wonderful to be true, if it be consistent with the laws of nature; and in such things as these, experiment is the best test of such consistency,” he wrote. Faraday discovered laws of electromagnetism, invented the first electric motor, and built the first electric generator—paving the way for our mechanized age, demonstrated the relation between electricity and chemical bonding, discovered the effect of magnetism on light, and discovered and named diamagnetism, the peculiar behaviour of certain substances in strong magnetic fields. He provided the experimental, and a good deal of the theoretical, foundation upon which James Clerk Maxwell erected classical electromagnetic field theory.

Faraday served in a number of scientific roles at the Royal Institution, an organization dedicated to promoting applied science. Eventually Faraday was appointed as its Fullerian Professor of Chemistry, a permanent position that allowed him to research and experiment to his heart’s content. His magnetic laboratory from the 1850s is now faithfully replicated in the Royal Institution’s Faraday Museum. It displays many of his world-changing gadgets, including an original Faraday disc, one of his early electrostatic generators, his chemical samples, and a giant magnet.

Click on the link to read more about Michael Faraday :https://drive.google.com/file/d/16BHrxErDY8SSmE0__ItzuhMPuSXDKh3D/view

Read this very exciting book, Faraday in 90 min on the great genius, written by John and Mary Gribbin. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1s1-K_wRzZ1RqBU6EVfyIK3knutXhUDvq/view